Thursday, 8 September 2016

[afrocarpus] UN DAILY NEWS from the UNITED NATIONS NEWS SERVICE

 

UN DAILY NEWS from the
UNITED NATIONS NEWS SERVICE

7 September, 2016

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AT ASEAN-UN SUMMIT, BAN HIGHLIGHTS COMPLEMENTARITY BETWEEN WORLD AND REGIONAL BODIES ON SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

Speaking at a gathering of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) and the United Nations today, Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon welcomed the focus of cooperation between the two organizations on a range of sectors, including the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, and gender equality and women's empowerment.

"The ASEAN-UN Plan of Action will advance the two major agreements reached last year for people, planet, prosperity, partnership and peace," Mr. Ban said in his opening remarks at the 8th ASEAN-UN Summit in Vientiane, the capital of the Lao People's Democratic Republic (Lao PDR), referring to the 2030 Agenda and its Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) as well at the Paris Agreement on climate change.
"Now we need the resources to put this plan into action," he added.

On 1 January 2016, the 17 SDGs of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development — adopted by world leaders in September last year – officially came into force. Over the next fifteen years, with the aim of achieving the SDGs, countries will mobilize efforts to end all forms of poverty, fight inequalities and tackle climate change, while ensuring that no one is left behind.

If nine more ASEAN countries ratify, we will have just 19 more countries to go.

In his remarks, the UN chief highlighted that the ASEAN-UN Plan of Action provides an opportunity to promote the complementarity of ASEAN's Community Vision 2025 with the 2030 Agenda.

He further encouraged ASEAN leaders to establish a coordinating mechanism, under their direct leadership, to ensure the implementation of the SDGs in their respective countries.

Turning to the Paris Agreement, Mr. Ban thanked the Lao PDR, which also holds the 2016 ASEAN chair, for depositing its instrument of ratification – thus becoming the first ASEAN country to do so. He called on other ASEAN leaders to follow suit and ratify the Paris Agreement at the earliest possible moment.

"We need 28 more countries to ratify, accounting for a further 16 per cent of greenhouse gas emissions, to bring this agreement into force," said the Secretary-General. "If nine more ASEAN countries ratify, we will have just 19 more countries to go."

Underscoring that both the Paris Agreement and the 2030 Agenda were founded on respect for human rights and democracy, Mr. Ban encouraged the gathered leaders to work for equality, inclusivity and accountability in their governments and societies.

"We must now explore ways to mainstream human rights across all areas of the ASEAN-UN partnership," he said.

Concluding his remarks, Mr. Ban congratulated Lao PDR for the launch of its own national sustainable development goal, centred on the removal of unexploded ordnance, and recalled his visit to a local school training people in demining and his visit to a community-based drug treatment centre in the capital, supported by the UN Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC).

The Secretary-General is currently in Lao PDR as part of a wider visit to Asia, which included visiting Singapore and China, in addition to attending the ASEAN-UN Summit and related meetings.

Earlier today, the UN chief also met the Lao PDR's President Bounnhang Vorachith, as well as Prime Minister Thongloun Sisoulith. In those encounters, Mr. Ban congratulated the country on its leadership of ASEAN and welcomed its ratification of the Paris Agreement on Climate Change.  

Also today, the Secretary-General attended the launch of the UN-Lao PDR Partnership Framework which includes 21 UN agencies supporting the country with a combined annual budget of $80 million for technical cooperation.

Speaking at the launch, Mr. Ban highlighted that the UN team will focus its programmes on supporting the country in its efforts to help the most vulnerable: poor children and young people; women in remote rural areas; people from disadvantaged ethnic groups; and people with disabilities.

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AFGHANISTAN: UN AID CHIEF CALLS FOR SCALED-UP SUPPORT TO ONE MILLION PEOPLE ON THE MOVE

Seeking $150 million for aid efforts in Afghanistan, the top United Nations relief official today called on the international community to urgently scale up its support for the war-torn country so that it can meet the rising humanitarian needs of more than one million people who are on the move, either internally displaced or returning from neighbouring countries.

"Now more than ever the international community must remain steadfast in support of the people of Afghanistan to provide for displaced families, new returnees and work to tackle the alarming malnutrition crisis to prevent more than 126,000 children from dying this year," the Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator, Stephen O'Brien, told a news conference in the Afghan capital of Kabul as he concluded his two-day visit to the country, according to a news release from the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA), which Mr. O'Brien heads.

OCHA resumed its operations in Afghanistan in 2009, providing humanitarian assistance in a complex environment where separate – and not always complementary – military, political and security objectives pose challenges to the implementation of humanitarian principles, the ability of responders to reach people in need and the safety and security of aid workers. In addition to being prone to recurrent natural disasters, Afghanistan has been in protracted conflict for almost 35 years, which has seriously hampered poverty reduction and development, strained the fabric of society and depleted its coping mechanisms.

According to OCHA, Afghanistan is facing a humanitarian crisis as highly vulnerable families will experience the severity of the upcoming Afghan winter, many for the first time. Also, currently, more than 1.1 million people have been displaced from their homes by the country's conflict, including roughly 245,000 this year alone. At the same time, more than 5,000 displaced Afghans are returning from Pakistan every day.

 UN Emergency Relief Coordinator, Stephen O'Brien, has urged the donor community to contribute around $150 million to respond to the escalating humanitarian needs of more than 1.1 million people, displaced by conflict in Afghanistan over the last 15 years.

As a result of this sudden influx of returnees, OCHA and its humanitarian partners in Afghanistan will launch a so-called Flash Appeal requesting around $150 million to support the humanitarian response to meet the needs of the spike in numbers of new people on the move. A Flash Appeal occurs within the context of any major sudden onset disaster that requires a coordinated response beyond the capacity of the government plus any single UN agency to respond to, and it outlines specific response plans to address acute humanitarian needs, normally for up to six months.

"We are asking our donors for around $150 million to respond to the urgent lifesaving needs for the next four months," Mr. O'Brien told the news conference. "As we implement our response plan, the government is preparing plans for longer-terms solutions for the resettlement of returnees. As the conflict continues with nearly a quarter of a million people displaced this year alone, the humanitarian and the protection of civilian needs are increasing and access constraints have escalated.

"The United Nations and our humanitarian partners are ready to scale up the response. But we urgently need international support and funding," the OCHA chief said. "I commend the international community for their engagement and encourage all donors to continue to stand by the people of Afghanistan to provide practical hope for the future.

The UN official also warned that widespread malnutrition, which he described as "a silent humanitarian emergency," claims more lives of children than the current conflict in Afghanistan, citing OCHA's statistics which show 2.7 million people affected by alarming levels of malnutrition, including a million children under the age of five.

Only 35 per cent of children with severe acute malnutrition are being reached and, of those, only 25 per cent are actually cured.
"More must be done to alleviate children's suffering and protect them from dying," said Mr. O'Brien, who also called on governments and other stakeholders to commit to saving lives through better health care services and tackling malnutrition.

In his remarks to the news conference, the UN relief chief also voiced concern over the safety of aid workers in Afghanistan, noting that 93 of them have been abducted since the beginning of 2016.

He said that all parties to the country's conflict are obliged to uphold the principles of international humanitarian law and ensure the protection of civilians and aid workers.

While in Afghanistan, the UN relief chief met with humanitarian partners, government officials and the diplomatic community, and visited displaced families affected by the country's ongoing conflict.

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NIGERIEN PEACEKEEPER PRESENTED WITH INAUGURAL UN MILITARY GENDER ADVOCATE AWARD FOR HER WORK IN MALI

A former United Nations peacekeeper from Niger has been presented with the inaugural UN Military Gender Advocate of the Year Award for her work in integrating gender perspectives into peacekeeping activities while serving in Mali.

"I am filled with a real sense of pleasure and satisfaction today. I am most grateful to the UN, and to the Government of Niger who deployed me as military staff, and I am also very happy in the name of all women," Major Aichatou Ousmane Issak said in a telephone interview with the UN News Centre from London, where the United Kingdom's Minister of State at the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, Baroness Joyce Anelay, presented her with the award on Wednesday evening.

The UN Military Gender Advocate of the Year Award recognises the dedication and effort of an individual peacekeeper in promoting the principles contained within the UN Security Council's resolution 1325, aimed at drawing attention to women in armed conflict and their role in peacekeeping and security.

Adopted in 2000, the resolution stresses the importance of women's equal and full participation as active agents in the prevention and resolution of conflicts, peace-building and peacekeeping. It calls on UN Member States to ensure women's equal participation and full involvement in all efforts for the maintenance and promotion of peace and security, and urges all actors to increase the participation of women and incorporate gender perspective in all areas of peace building.

Nine peacekeeping missions nominated peacekeepers to be considered for the award and were graded on how they integrated the principles of resolution 1325 into military functional areas.

According to the UN Department of Peacekeeping Operations, Major Issak – then serving at the rank of captain – stood out for her work with the UN Multidimensional Integrated Stabilization Mission in Mali (MINUSMA), particularly in the eastern region of Gao, where she served in a civilian-military cooperation unit.

While there, she developed quick impact projects that aided the local population, accompanied what would have been all-male patrols thus making them more approachable and accessible to local women and children, and spent considerable time and effort training fellow staff officers and reaching out to women in the local community.

"As you know we bring something different than men, a different vision – I think as a woman I brought a different perspective in the peace process and some ideas that helped the men make some decisions," Major Issak said.

"Making women part of the patrols is important because on certain terrains of operation it is difficult to get certain information," the 42-year-old mother of three added. "In the specific case of Gao, it is important for women to partake in patrols because in the Muslim religion men do not have access to homes but with women access to households is easy, so you can identify what the needs are and then report them to the hierarchy and then help the population."

Major Issak's award comes a day ahead of the UN Peacekeeping Defence Ministerial taking place in London on Thursday. Hosted by the Government of the United Kingdom, the gathering is a follow-on event to the Leaders' Summit on Peacekeeping hosted by Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon and US President Barack Obama last year.

During the Ministerial, Defence Ministers will review progress on the implementation of last September's pledges and announce new commitments, develop a shared plan for how peacekeeping can help implement the women, peace and security agenda and focus on operationalising pledges through better training, force generation, pre-deployment processes, doctrine, equipment, leadership, performance, lessons learned mechanisms and rapid response capability. The Ministerial will also discuss how to prevent and respond to sexual exploitation and abuse allegations.

Those attending include the Under-Secretaries-General for Peacekeeping Operations and Fiedl Support, Hervé Ladsous and Atul Khare, as well as the Special Coordinator on improving the UN response to sexual exploitation and abuse, Jane Holl Lute and other peacekeeping officials.

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UN HEALTH AGENCY CALLS FOR MULTI-SECTORAL APPROACH TO DEAL WITH 'DOUBLE BURDEN' OF MALNUTRITION IN SOUTH-EAST ASIA

While announcing a strategic action plan to deal with the issue, the United Nations health agency today called for a whole-of-society approach to address the double burden of malnutrition which affects populations across south-east Asia, particularly women and girls.

"The current nutrition profile of the south-east Asia region is characterized by under-nutrition rates that are declining slowly alongside rapidly rising rates of overweight and obesity, often within the same communities, and even in the same households," the World Health Organization's (WHO) Regional Director for the South-East Asia Region, Dr. Poonam Khetrapal Singh, said in a news release today.

"This double burden is depriving people of reaching their potential, and is fuelling rising rates of non-communicable diseases," she added. "We need to mobilize multi-sectoral action to address the problem at the earliest."

According to WHO, across south-east Asia, an estimated 60 million children under the age of five are stunted, a condition characterized by reduced growth rate and development, while 8.8 million are overweight. Furthermore, thinness affects 24 to 47 per cent of adolescent girls, while between two and 24 per cent are overweight and the prevalence of overweight or obesity among adult women ranges between 18-30 per cent.

Highlighting that ending all forms of malnutrition is an important component of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, Dr. Khetrapal Singh said that WHO, in consultation with its regional member countries, developed a strategic action plan to reduce the double burden of malnutrition. "This will provide the basis for action moving forward," she noted.

According to the news release, the action plan, which covers from 2016 to 2025, will serve as an advocacy and reference tool for the health agency's local members to ensure that national interventions are comprehensive and evidence-based. It emphasizes the importance of promoting a supporting environment for nutrition interventions and securing multi-sectoral commitment, including commitment from the private sector, to address the issues.

The news release added that the strategic action plan was adopted by WHO's Regional Committee for South-East Asia, its highest decision making body for the region. The Regional Committee is made up of 11 member countries – Bangladesh, Bhutan, the Democratic People's Republic of Korea, India, Indonesia, Maldives, Myanmar, Nepal, Sri Lanka, Thailand and Timor-Leste – and has been holding its 69th regional meeting in the Sri Lankan capital of Colombo today.



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ON EVE OF LITERACY DAY, UN SECRETARY-GENERAL HIGHLIGHTS LITERACY'S ROLE IN 2030 AGENDA

On the eve of International Literacy Day, United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon called on governments and their partners, including in the private sector, to join forces for universal literacy and build peaceful, just, inclusive and sustainable societies – a vision set out in the new global development agenda.

"This year, the world has embarked on implementing the ambitious and transformational 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. With its 17 universal, integrated and interdependent Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), the 2030 Agenda is an action plan for people, planet, partnership and peace," the UN chief said in his message for the occasion.

"Literacy stands at heart of the 2030 Agenda," he added. "It is a foundation for human rights, gender equality, and sustainable societies. It is essential to all our efforts to end extreme poverty and promote well-being for all people. That is why the Sustainable Development Goals aim for universal access to quality education and learning opportunities throughout people's lives."

However, the Secretary-General noted, while significant progress has been made over the past five decades, "the world is still very far from universal literacy," and he called on governments and their partners, including in the private sector, to "join forces for universal literacy so we can translate the vision of the 2030 Agenda into reality and build peaceful, just, inclusive and sustainable societies."

Literacy Day marks 50th anniversary

This year marks the 50th anniversary since the UN Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) proclaimed 8 September as International Literacy Day in 1966 in order to actively mobilize the international community and to promote literacy as an instrument to empower individuals, communities and societies. According to UNESCO, this year's theme is 'Reading the Past, Writing the Future,' and celebrates the past five decades of national and international engagement, efforts and progress made to increase literacy rates around the world. It also addresses current challenges and looks to innovative solutions to further boost literacy in the future.

Noting that this is the first year of implementation of the 2030 Agenda, UNESCO stated on its website that, in this context, the vision of literacy is aligned with lifelong learning opportunities with special focus on youth and adults – literacy is a part of Goal 4 of the Sustainable Development Goals that make up the 2030 Agenda. Goal 4 aims to 'ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all,' and its target is that by 2030 all youth and a substantial proportion of adults, both men and women, achieve literacy and numeracy.

"The world has changed since 1966 – but our determination to provide every woman and man with the skills, capacities and opportunities to become everything they wish, in dignity and respect, remains as firm as ever. Literacy is a foundation to build a more sustainable future for all," UNESCO's Director-General Irina Bokova said in her message for the Day.

In his message, Mr. Ban flagged that today, with the world becoming increasingly digitized and information rich, new opportunities and challenges are emerging, with more than 750 million adults illiterate, two-thirds of whom are female and including 115 million young people. Some 250 million children of primary school age lack basic literacy skills and 124 million children and adolescents receive no schooling at all.

Such obstacles to sustainable development can and must be overcome by developing and implementing the right policies, backed up by commitment and resources, the UN chief said.

"We need to ensure that those out of school get access to quality learning opportunities, we need to improve the quality of schooling, and we need to promote adult education and learning," he added.

UNESCO chief: illiterate miss out on benefits

UNESCO's Ms. Bokova also highlighted how those who are illiterate receive none of the benefits of globalization and suffer all its costs.

"These women and men are more vulnerable to ill heath, exploitation and human rights abuse. They are more likely to be unemployed and paid less. Unable to read or write, they are held back from their full potential, and whole communities are locked into vicious cycles of poverty that lay the conditions for violence and strife," she said.

"Illiteracy remains synonymous with exclusion and poverty – we must turn this around," she added.
The main global celebration of the day will take place at UNESCO Headquarters in the French capital of Paris in the form of a two-day conference starting today, the highlight of which will be the awarding of literacy prizes. At the same time, UNESCO will launch the Global Alliance for Literacy, a new initiative to make all major stakeholders pull together to promote literacy as a foundation for lifelong learning.

* * *

REJECT BIGOTRY, BUILD BRIDGES ACROSS COMMUNITIES – UN CHIEF TO HIGH-LEVEL FORUM ON ANTI-SEMITISM

Describing religious intolerance as one of the greatest global threats, United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon today urged the world to join together for peaceful coexistence and a life of dignity for all.

"Violence against people because of their religious identity or beliefs is an assault on the core values of the UN," underlined Mr. Ban in a video message to an event titled 'High-level Forum on Anti-Semitism,' held today at the UN Headquarters in New York.

"Time and again, history has shown that those who attack one minority today, will target another tomorrow. Discrimination does not discriminate," he said.

In his message to the event – organized by the governments of Canada, Israel, the United States and the Delegation of the European Union – the Secretary-General also noted that anti-Semitism is one of the world's oldest, most pervasive and deadliest forms of hatred and that despite the horror of the Holocaust, Jews continue to be targeted for murder and abuse solely because they are Jews.

He further emphasized that along with a global rise in anti-Semitism, other alarming forms of discrimination, particularly those targeted against refugees and migrants, are also on the rise. "Let us reject bigotry, uphold human rights, and build bridges across communities," he urged.



* * *

UN AGRICULTURAL AGENCY AND USAID SIGN AGREEMENT TO BOOST DEVELOPING COUNTRIES' ABILITY TO TRACK KEY DATA

The United Nations agricultural agency today signed a $15 million agreement with the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) to boosting the capacity of developing countries to track key agricultural data – information considered essential to good policy-making and that will help track progress toward achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

"In the decades to come, humanity will need to produce more food for a growing population using natural resources such as water, land and biodiversity in a sustainable way – while coping with the challenges imposed by climate change," the Director-General of the UN Food and Agriculture Organization, JosĂ© Graziano da Silva, said in a news release.

 "Our ability to boost food yields sustainably and meet the SDG hunger eradication target will hinge on the availability of better, cost-effective and timely statistical data for agriculture and rural areas" he added.

On 1 January 2016, the 17 SDGs of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development — adopted by world leaders in September last year – officially came into force. Over the next fifteen years, with the aim of achieving the SDGs, countries will mobilize efforts to end all forms of poverty, fight inequalities and tackle climate change, while ensuring that no one is left behind.

In particular, Goal 2 of the SDGs is centred on ending hunger, achieving food security, improving nutrition, and promoting sustainable agriculture. According to FAO, Goal 2 recognizes the interlinkages among supporting sustainable agriculture, empowering small farmers, promoting gender equality, ending rural poverty, ensuring healthy lifestyles, tackling climate change, and other issues.

The USAID donation will cover the first phase of an FAO-led project that will run from 2016 to 2021, starting with pilot efforts in four developing countries – two in sub-Saharan Africa, one in Latin America and one in Asia. A dialogue is under way with eligible countries.

 The goal of the project is to design and implement a new and cost-effective approach to agricultural data collection in developing world contexts, known as agricultural integrated surveys (AGRIS).

In the news release, FAO said that the AGRIS methodology will not only capture improved annual data on agricultural production, but also broader and more detailed structural information relating to farms, including employment, machinery use, production costs, farming practices, and environmental impacts.

It will incorporate recent innovations like remote sensing, global positioning systems (GPS), mobile technology and various uses of 'big data.' These tools will introduce more objective approaches to measuring agricultural performance, in some cases replacing traditional, more expensive methods. In addition to better and more detailed data, AGRIS is also expected to promote the integration of disparate data sources, improve data timeliness and usability, and cut data collection costs.

"The end result," according to FAO, "will be high-quality data on a wide range of technical, economic, environmental and social dimensions of agriculture that will help governments analyse and understand the impacts of agricultural policies, assess progress toward the SDGs and other goals, and shape better policies."

"Strong national data systems are critical for governments and private sector actors to make informed and smart decisions that foster food security and economic prosperity," the Assistant to the Administrator for USAID's Bureau for Food Security, Beth Dunford, said in the FAO news release.

* * *

STATE PARTIES TO UN-BACKED TREATY AGREE TO AIM FOR CLEARANCE OF CLUSTER BOMBS BY 2030

An annual meeting of State Parties to the United Nations-backed pact banning cluster bombs ended today in Geneva, with an agreement on a target to complete by 2030 clearance of these explosive remnants of war that kill large numbers of civilians.

"I am very pleased that we have agreed on 2030 as a target date for completion," said Henk Cor van der Kwast of the Netherlands, the President of the Sixth Meeting of the States Parties to the  Convention on Cluster Munitions, in a news release.

Cluster munitions, or unexploded ordnance, kill and injure large numbers of civilians and cause long lasting socio-economic problems. The Convention, which prohibits all use, production, transfer and stockpiling of these devices, entered into force on 1 August 2010, just two years after it opened for signature in the Norwegian capital, Oslo. To date, 119 states have joined the Convention.

At the First Review Conference of the Convention held in Dubrovnik, Croatia, in September 2015, the State Parties adopted the Dubrovnik Action Plan, which lists concrete steps to implement the Convention in the period from 2015 to 2020.

The Plan seeks to increase adherence to the treaty, assist State Parties to develop resourced plans for destroying stocks, clearing contaminated lands, providing risk-reduction education and strengthening national capacity for victim assistance, among other core work.

Ridding the world of heinous cluster munitions is a moral and humanitarian imperative

This year's conference covered a range of topics, including universal adoption of the treaty, destruction of stockpiles, clearing contaminated areas, transparency measures, victim assistance and international cooperation.

The conference's president reiterated the need to end the use of cluster munitions in conflicts. "No State should use these indiscriminate weapons. We call upon States not party using this banned weapon, to cease further use and abide by the provisions set by this Convention," Mr. van der Kwast said.

In a message sent to the opening of the conference, Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon stressed that the UN will continue to support all efforts aimed at the universalization of the Convention. His message was read by Mary Soliman, Acting Director of the Geneva Branch of the UN Office for Disarmament Affairs.

"With the adoption of the Dubrovnik Action Plan, States parties have set an ambitious path of concrete actions and specific deadlines for the Convention's further implementation by the Second Review Conference in 2020," he said.

Actions are to be undertaken, he added, in the crucial areas of universalization, stockpile destruction, clearance and risk reduction education, victim assistance, international cooperation and assistance, transparency and national implementation measures.

"Our shared hope is to achieve the destruction of additional stockpiled cluster munitions, the release of previously contaminated land for productive use and, ultimately, a reduction in the number of new victims," Mr. Ban said. "Ridding the world of heinous cluster munitions is a moral and humanitarian imperative."

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The hate of men will pass, and dictators die, and the power they took from the people will return to the people. And so long as men die, liberty will never perish.
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Monday, 5 September 2016

[afrocarpus] Thought of the day: Some UK’s weaknesses that have been revealed by the Brexit

 

Thought of the day: Some UK's weaknesses that have been revealed by the Brexit
 
1) Economically, UK  heavily relies on foreign investments. This is why Japan is  telling UK how Brexit should keep Japan's business interests in UK. If UK does not listen to Japan, there will be serious economic consequences to British people.
 
2) It is hard to find in  UK's supermarkets  and homes, something made in UK. From stationary to a glass that  British  people use to drink water, everything is imported from  China. The next step will be energy that  will be delivered to British homes by China. This is why the PM Theresa May is worried about these trends.
 
3) David Cameron and George Osborne have been competing against the world in accessing  Chinese's investments. They have been obsessed with Chinese's money.
 
4) UK is now like Africa regarding begging Chinese investments.  It is seems to be easier for China to dump  cheaper and low quality products in Africa and UK. African leaders have turned to China which   defends and helps African  regimes that are characterised by human rights abuses and dictatorship.  Like Japan, in the future, China may also warn UK about any attempt that could  affect Chinese businesses in the UK.
 
Conclusion
 
British politicians claim that with Brexit, they will get control of everything:  the economy, laws,  immigration and  money.  As the result of this, UK will become an independent and sovereign country. The  warning from Japan and recent Chinese threats over the new nuclear plant have demonstrated that British economic independence is out of reach for now.

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The price good men pay for indifference to public affairs is to be ruled by evil men.
When the white man came we had the land and they had the bibles; now they have the land and we have the bibles.
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“The hate of men will pass, and dictators die, and the power they took from the people will return to the people. And so long as men die, liberty will never perish.”

“I have loved justice and hated iniquity: therefore I die in exile.

“The price good men pay for indifference to public affairs is to be ruled by evil men.”

“When the white man came we had the land and they had the bibles; now they have the land and we have the bibles.”